Please note that the program is published in Central European Summer Time (CEST).

Back to overview

Lecture

In-situ Laser Interference Patterning for the production of regular arrays of Nanostructures (progress on the EU project ‘Nanostencil’)

Thursday (25.06.2020)
10:50 - 11:10 Room 1
Part of:


The Nanostencil project seeks to utilise laser interference lithography to pattern surfaces during the materials synthesis phase. Using this unique in-situ approach we aim to produce dense arrays of identical nanostructures of precise size, shape and composition. The program, which involves five partners, is applying this technique to a number of diverse materials systems and reaction methods. The presentation will summarise the progress so far on this EU funded program1.

In our approach, multi-beam laser interference patterning is applied by means of splitting and combining ultrashort UV pulses to produce an interference pattern on the reacting surface. The pattern pitch is dependent on the laser wavelength and incident angle and can be configured to be in the range of a few hundred nm to several microns. The interference pattern generates transient photothermal gradients at nanoscale on the growth surface, resulting in the formation of spatially organized nanoislands. The technique is applied to three materials systems; the MBE growth of III-V nanostructures, the CVD growth of zinc oxide and the surface reaction of metal films with supercritical CO2. The project involves optimising the laser interference technique for application to materials surfaces. Developments of high-power, high coherence, pulsed lasers to enable these reactions are also part of the project.

Speaker:
Prof. Mark Hopkinson
The University of Sheffield
Additional Authors:
  • Dr. Santiago Olaizola
    CEIT-IK4
  • Prof. Dr. Erkki Levänen
    Tampere University
  • Prof. Dr. Dayou Li
    University of Bedfordshire
  • Dr. Andreas Börner
    Innolas Laser

Dateien

Category Short file description File description File Size
Extended Abstract Nanostencil Presentation Short Abstract 123 KB Download